The Thomoraii calendar

Unlike Earth, Sheesania has years of about 411.68 days. (The length of each day is different from the length of an Earth day, also, but I’m not going to address that in this article.) Different Sheesanian cultures have measured years differently, but one of the most sophisticated Sheesanian calendars in common use today is the Thomoraii calendar. Its ancestor was a calendar created in the early days of the Thomoraii empire to help make administration easier. Later on, as it became more and more clear that the calendar didn’t quite align with the year, the famous Thomoraii emperor Amjâi commissioned some scholars working for him to revamp the calendar and make it more accurate. Their final result, more or less, has been used for hundreds of years in Thomoraii and is still very common today, though the Uniatic calendar is also widely in use in Thomorai.

This calendar divides the year into 21 months – 11 cold and dry months and 10 hot and wet months. The first 20 months each have 20 days, and the last month has 12 days. Every three years, about two days of the last month are lost to compensate for that fraction of a day in the length of a Sheesanian year. Years are counted from what’s considered the foundation of the Thomoraii empire – Emperor Fesǎnsolai’s official establishment of his capital in Ôbtobâi. The current Thomoraii year is 2219.

Then there are names for each week in a month – the first week, the second week, etc. – and the days of the week. To refer to a specific day of the month, you can combine the name of the week with the name of the day of the week. So for example, here’s what the first month of the year, Yakaʔîri Nǔmiâira or the Month of Nŭmiâir, would look like.

Dâhwegǔa

Dâḣǎtěǎ

Dâhnǔǎ

Dâhsela

Bâlfaia

Bâlfaia-Dâhwegǔa

Bâlfaia-Dâḣǎtěǎ

Bâlfaia-Dâhnǔǎ

Bâlfaia-Dâhsela

Bâlnǔǎ

Bâlnǔǎ-Dâhwegǔa

Bâlnǔǎ-Dâḣǎtěǎ

Bâlnǔǎ-Dâhnǔǎ

Bâlnǔǎ-Dâhsela

Bâlǐma

Bâlǐma-Dâhwegǔa

Bâlǐma-Dâḣǎtěǎ

Bâlǐma-Dâhnǔǎ

Bâlǐma-Dâhsela

Bâlôâ

Bâlôâ-Dâhwegǔa

Bâlôâ-Dâḣǎtěǎ

Bâlôâ-Dâhnǔǎ

Bâlôâ-Dâhsela

Bâlȟia

Bâlȟia-Dâhwegǔa

Bâlȟia-Dâḣǎtěǎ

Bâlȟia-Dâhnǔǎ

Bâlȟia-Dâhsela

In colloquial speech, you’d probably leave the “bâl” off the names of the weeks – bâl just means “week” – and you’d also probably leave the “dâh” off the names of the days of the week – again, dâh just means “day.” However, more commonly in colloquial speech, you’d refer to a day of the month using its name in the Thomoraii lunar calendar. Here’s an example of what names you might give to the days of the Month of Nŭmiâir according to the lunar calendar.

Dâhwegǔa

Dâḣǎtěǎ

Dâhnǔǎ

Dâhsela

Bâlfaia

Šǎnšǒm

Šǎnǐbâ

Šǎnět

Šǎnwâo

Bâlnǔǎ

Šǎněsa

Šǎnǔwa

Ḣǎk

Ḣǎkfe

Bâlǐma

Ḣǎkšǒm

Ḣǎgǐbâ

Ḣǎgět

Ḣǎkwâo

Bâlôâ

Ḣǎgěsa

Ḣǎgǔwa

Dêeli

Dêešǒm

Bâlȟia

Dêibâ

Dêět

Dêewâo

Dêěsa

So when would you use the solar calendar and when would you use the lunar calendar? In general, you’d use the solar calendar for names of weeks, days of the week, and months, but the lunar calendar for the names of days of the month. You’d only use the solar calendar for days of the month if you were trying to be very formal or very accurate, or sometimes if you wanted it to be easier in the future to tell where a day was in the month. For instance, newspaper articles in Thomoraii generally use the solar calendar for days of the month, since they want to make it easier for researchers in the future to keep track of when specific articles were published.

Here’s a PDF of a complete calendar, including names for days of the month according to the lunar calendar, for the Thomoraii year 2219. This calendar also shows the name of each month.

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